Watch Kiss the Ground movie with IMM Earthcare 7 pm Monday 3/7


Margaret McCasland
 

from Betsy Keokosky:
Announcement to celebrate Spring: Two Zooms on a Paradigm Shift in Farming

The robins have come back! March is the month in which the vernal equinox
marks an important point in the Earth’s tilted orbit around the sun. It lets us know
the sun’s rays will now begin hitting our part of the Earth for a longer period of
each day. Praise be!

To celebrate this seasonal event Earthcare is announcing a related set of
presentations. Sponsorship is shared with our local municipalities: Danby and
Dryden: Earthcare is presenting a film; the Danby Conservation Advisory
Council is sponsoring the talk; the speaker is a member of the Dryden
Conservation Board.

The first event, organized by the IMM Earthcare committee, shows a movie, “Kiss the Ground.” It is a 45-minute short version with more focus on farming than the longer version available on Netflix. It is scheduled for Monday, March 7th at 7pm.    Zoom link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81060424968?pwd=eUVOZ2d3TTVUT1NwNnZEYUV
3SzlsZz09

The second event is a follow-up Zoom given by Danby that will present a talk on “A Paradigm Shift to Bio-Sequestration: Regenerative Agriculture” that takes up where the movie left off. This presentation is given by Timothy Woods, a retired systems ecologist/field biologist/environmental engineer, educator, and entrepreneur. 
It is on Thursday, March 10 th at 7pm. For the Zoom Link see the
Danby NY Calendar for March 10 at https://danby.ny.gov/event/

The paradigm shift is from farming that is extractive and human oriented to
farming that is regenerative and within nature’s ecology. Particularly, since
WWII, farming has become geared, like industry, to efficiency, production, and
profit. With the advent of the global economy in the 90s, large farms and
transnational corporations have been locked into a high fertilizer, high pesticide,
high irrigation cycle that ignores soil health, to the detriment of the land, water,
and biodiversity resources. Regenerative agriculture recognizes the importance
of the soil microbiome and the bacteria and fungi that work cooperatively with
plant roots for the well being of us all. This talk is to educate agriculturalists,
farmers, and gardeners of the benefits of using regenerative methods and
limiting the destructive effects of tilling, fertilizers, and pesticides.

PS from Margaret: Also relevant to anyone who eats food, and wants to do so mindfully.